Recent Community Posts

The Dreaded Flu Season

1/8/2021 (Permalink)

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Serious outcomes of a flu infection can result in hospitalization or death, according to the American Red Cross. Seasonal flu in the United States occurs in the fall and winter months. While influenza viruses circulate year round, most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, but activity can last as late as May. Flu viruses are spread by droplets made when people with the flu cough, sneeze, or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people nearby or be inhaled into their lungs. Healthy habits to help prevent the flu include getting vaccinated, avoiding close contact with others, staying at home when you're sick, covering your mouth and nose, washing your hands, avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth, and practicing other good health habits. Stay informed about public health recommendations related to the flu by visiting the CDC website.

Dangers of Extreme Cold

12/21/2020 (Permalink)

While your home may be damaged due to winter weather and extreme cold, your personal health is also at risk. Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as heart attacks from overexertion, according to Ready.gov. That is why it’s important to be aware of the effect extremely cold temperatures can have on you.

Frostbite is caused when your skin is exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Physical symptoms include white or grayish-yellow skin, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, and numbness. Hypothermia is when your body temperature falls to an abnormally low temperature caused from long exposure to cold weather. Signs of hypothermia include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness. If someone's body temperature is below 95°F, seek medical attention immediately. To avoid these conditions, stay indoors, if possible. If not, dress in layers to stay warm and keep dry. 

National Influenza Vaccination Week

12/18/2020 (Permalink)

Starting in 2005, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) established the National Influenza Vaccination Week to highlight the importance of continuing flu vaccination throughout the holiday season and beyond.
During the 2017-2018 flu season, the CDC estimates the flu caused 49 million flu-related illnesses (more than the combined populations of Texas and Florida), 960,000 flu hospitalizations (more than the number of staffed hospital beds in the United States), and 79,000 deaths (more than the average number of people who attend the Super Bowl each year.) If you’ve already gotten the flu this season, you should still get vaccinated to protect yourself against other strands of the flu. People with a high risk of complications from the flu include young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions, and people over the age of 65. Get a flu shot today to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Weather Warnings on the go

11/30/2020 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government-alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. There is no sign-up required. Alerts are sent automatically to WEA capable phones during a threatening weather emergency.
According to weather.gov, alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. The types of alerts the National Weather Service will send out are typically about tsunami warnings, tornado and flash flood warnings, hurricane, typhoon, storm surges and extreme wind warnings, as well as dust storms and snow squall warnings.
When you receive a WEA, follow any action advised by the emergency message, especially if it involves an immediate evacuation. Seek more details from your preferred television or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, or another trusted source of information. 

National Day of Service and Remembrance

9/11/2020 (Permalink)

In honor and memory of those who died on September 11, 2001, as well as the survivors and First Responders, National Day of Service and Remembrance was established in 2009 as a day of reflection. Led by the Corporation for National and Community Service, this is a day to come together as Americans following the events of 9/11 to help neighbors in need and to honor veterans and First Responders in your community. On this day and everyday, SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas salutes those heroes who arrive in the greatest times of need and stand strong in the face of disaster. These heroes are the First Responders who keep our communities safe in trying times. Give back and make a difference in your community this year. To find a volunteer opportunity near you, or to register your National Day of Service and Remembrance event, visit https://nationalservice.gov/serve/september-11th-national-day-service-and-remembrance

Dangers of Extreme Cold

1/2/2020 (Permalink)

While your home may be damaged due to winter weather and extreme cold, your personal health is also at risk. Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as heart attacks from overexertion, according to Ready.gov. That is why it’s important to be aware of the effect extremely cold temperatures can have on you.

Frostbite is caused when your skin is exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Physical symptoms include white or grayish-yellow skin, skin that feels unusually firm or waxy, and numbness. Hypothermia is when your body temperature falls to an abnormally low temperature caused from long exposure to cold weather. Signs of hypothermia include shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, and drowsiness. If someone's body temperature is below 95°F, seek medical attention immediately. To avoid these conditions, stay indoors, if possible. If not, dress in layers to stay warm and keep dry. 

Weather Warnings on the go

12/9/2019 (Permalink)

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) are emergency messages sent by authorized government-alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Government partners include local and state public safety agencies, FEMA, the FCC, the Department of Homeland Security, and the National Weather Service. There is no sign-up required. Alerts are sent automatically to WEA capable phones during a threatening weather emergency.
According to weather.gov, alerts received at the right time can help keep you safe during an emergency. The types of alerts the National Weather Service will send out are typically about tsunami warnings, tornado and flash flood warnings, hurricane, typhoon, storm surges and extreme wind warnings, as well as dust storms and snow squall warnings.
When you receive a WEA, follow any action advised by the emergency message, especially if it involves an immediate evacuation. Seek more details from your preferred television or radio station, NOAA Weather Radio, or another trusted source of information. 

National Influenza Vaccination Week

12/3/2019 (Permalink)

Starting in 2005, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) established the National Influenza Vaccination Week to highlight the importance of continuing flu vaccination throughout the holiday season and beyond.
During the 2017-2018 flu season, the CDC estimates the flu caused 49 million flu-related illnesses (more than the combined populations of Texas and Florida), 960,000 flu hospitalizations (more than the number of staffed hospital beds in the United States), and 79,000 deaths (more than the average number of people who attend the Super Bowl each year.) If you’ve already gotten the flu this season, you should still get vaccinated to protect yourself against other strands of the flu. People with a high risk of complications from the flu include young children, pregnant women, people with certain chronic health conditions, and people over the age of 65. Get a flu shot today to protect yourself and your loved ones.

National Day of Service and Remembrance

9/11/2019 (Permalink)

In honor and memory of those who died on September 11, 2001, as well as the survivors and First Responders, National Day of Service and Remembrance was established in 2009 as a day of reflection. Led by the Corporation for National and Community Service, this is a day to come together as Americans following the events of 9/11 to help neighbors in need and to honor veterans and First Responders in your community. On this day and everyday, SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas salutes those heroes who arrive in the greatest times of need and stand strong in the face of disaster. These heroes are the First Responders who keep our communities safe in trying times. Give back and make a difference in your community this year. To find a volunteer opportunity near you, or to register your National Day of Service and Remembrance event, visit https://nationalservice.gov/serve/september-11th-national-day-service-and-remembrance

Summer Ready

7/7/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Northern Las Vegas is “Ready for whatever happens.” You can be too this summer. 

Each year, families and friends across the country enjoy the summer months with barbecues, camping trips,or by cooling off in a pool or lake. To enjoy these occasions, it is important to keep safety top of mind to ensure you have fun in the sun. 

According to a recent study by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, nearly 11,900 Americans were injured by fireworks in 2015,with the majority happening in the month surrounding the Fourth of July. Another 8,700 are injured by charcoal/wood-burning and propane grill fires.A grill should always be supervised when in use. Keep children and pets a safe distance from the grilling area to prevent accidental burns or tipping of the grill. 

Grills also cause an average of 8,900 home structure or outdoor fires.“These fires caused an annual average of 50 civilian injuries and $2 million in direct property damage,” according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). 

If you enjoy lounging by the pool or going for a boat ride to cool off from the summer sun, make sure you exercise caution, especially when children are present. Only swim in approved areas and supervise children at all times when near the water. 

The summer season should be a time to make memories and enjoy the great outdoors. Don’t become a statistic. Take precautions to prevent these events from putting a damper on your summer months!